AREDN a quick report


Nat 2733E N6BRV
 

Quick summary:

 

Yesterday, I visited Andre K6AH QTH and exchanged my Homemade gourmet bread with his AREDN Antenna & Hardware.

I dully placed the Mikrotik 5GHz Antenna on my diminutive window and WOW, AREDN is running.

The 3 high Res (4Mb) pictures in the attachment were sent by RF AREDN through 5 GHz MikroTik. Looks like the original. Handshake – flawless.

 

In summary,

·         The one hop to AI6BX node worked well with 7.5Mbps (7,500Kbps) rate.  Actual speed test (tunnel through Los Angeles server, I’m in Carlsbad now) yielded ~ 0.4Mbps (400Kbps). Without optimized antenna direction.  Will retest when the antenna direction is optimized with San Diego server.

·         Everything is done by the AREDN software, just have to configure the setup appropriately.

·         Sending and receiving eMails, Browsing the Internet were as transparent as if I was using commercial WAN attached to my LAN.

 

Overall, I’m excited to learning more and grow with AREDN.

And many thanks again to Andre K6AH and the AREDN team. They’ve done an excellent job so far to say the least.

 

73' N6BRV Nat S.

 

From: main@ARC2-SDICC.groups.io [mailto:main@ARC2-SDICC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Andre Hansen
Sent: Friday, September 10, 2021 1:14 PM
To: main@arc2-sdicc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ARC2-SDICC] Great use case of AREDN supporting cloud based computing

 

The theoretical limit on an AREDN link is 144 Mbps based on the 802.11n RF encoding scheme.  The 400 Mbps they describe in the article refers to the user WIFI connection.

 

Note that the San Diego AREDN backbone network is in the process of being redesigned to be in compliance with recent FCC spectrum changes.  Also note that ownership of the backbone has been transferred to Keith, AI6BX, because I am no longer able to service these nodes.

 

73,

 

Andre, K6AH

From: main@ARC2-SDICC.groups.io [mailto:main@ARC2-SDICC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mark Warrick (KM6ZPO)
Sent: Friday, September 10, 2021 7:28 AM
To: main@ARC2-SDICC.groups.io
Subject: [ARC2-SDICC] Great use case of AREDN supporting cloud based computing

 

It is my understanding that the American Red Cross relies entirely upon their computing systems, all of which are cloud based. Therefore, I will focus my attention upon solutions that meet that basic operating need of every part of this organization.  

I am a ham radio operator, but I also have 40 years of computing experience. I recognize that no form of radio communications can support the data needs of the organization. AREDN CAN fill the gaps of necessary data links when they are down.  We only need to put effort into figuring out how. 

https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/publicsector/amateur-radio-meets-edge-computing-keep-disaster-response-teams-connected/?fbclid=IwAR2rnqiuG4vKnKjIpgnwB8bAfVUHjvCAtebLt8Uf83Y0jyMVAKyH32Nz3d4

—-mark

 


 
Edited

Excellent, Nat, you're on the AREDN MESH.  I agree that if you find a better mount point for that dish, you'll get better results.  But 7 Mbps is not too shabby.  That's plenty enough for voice and video calls.

http://n6brv-qth.local.mesh:8080/cgi-bin/mesh

Now that you're here, drop by my home node (KM6ZPO-HAP-LITE) to see some services that are common on the MESH:

http://km6zpo-hap-lite.local.mesh:8080/cgi-bin/mesh

You will find:
  1. A voice over IP PBX (you can't login - but you'll see the admin screen)
  2. An email server (useful for hams to communicate with non-hams) - Non hams can login from the non-ham (Internet) side: http://mail.km6zpo.com/Mondo/lang/sys/login.aspx
  3. MeshChat (simple, common "chat" service) http://km6zpo-pi.local.mesh/meshchat/ 
  4. A MeshMap http://km6zpo-pi.local.mesh//meshmap/webpage/map_display.php 
  5. A TeamTalk Server (voice, chat, file sharing, etc.)   http://km6zpo-pi.local.mesh:10333/   u:guest p:guest
  6. A Mumble Server (voice and text chat) http://km6zpo-mumble-server.local.mesh:64738/  u:guest p:password
  7. An IP phone (direct IP dial 10.95.79.46 - or dial via the PBX - Xtn. 5000 or dial via an outside POTS line (ask me for the number) or Ham Shack Hotline 50160
  8. A simple website: http://km6zpo-website.local.mesh/wordpress/
  9. And finally, you'll see a Winlink Relay there.
Got Winlink? Try a telnet post office connection to simulate the ability to send messages even with an Internet outage.  My Winlink Relay Server: km6zpo-winlink.local.mesh standard port 8772

---mark
KM6ZPO
Santa Ana


Fred Curtis, KI6GRO
 

On Monday, September 13, 2021, 14:47, Mark Warrick (KM6ZPO) <mark@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Excellent, Nat, you're on the AREDN MESH.  I agree that if you find a better mount point for that dish, you'll get better results.  But 7 Mbps is not too shabby.  That's plenty enough for voice and video calls.

http://n6brv-qth.local.mesh:8080/cgi-bin/mesh

Now that you're here, drop by my home node (KM6ZPO-HAP-LITE) to see some services that are common on the MESH:

http://km6zpo-hap-lite.local.mesh:8080/cgi-bin/mesh

You will find:
  1. A voice over IP PBX (you can't login - but you'll see the admin screen)
  2. An email server (useful for hams to communicate with non-hams) - Non hams can login from the non-ham (Internet) side: http://mail.km6zpo.com/Mondo/lang/sys/login.aspx
  3. MeshChat (simple, common "chat" service) http://km6zpo-pi.local.mesh/meshchat/ 
  4. A MeshMap http://km6zpo-pi.local.mesh//meshmap/webpage/map_display.php 
  5. A TeamTalk Server (voice, chat, file sharing, etc.)   http://km6zpo-pi.local.mesh:10333/   u:guest p:guest
  6. A Mumble Server (voice and text chat) http://km6zpo-mumble-server.local.mesh:64738/  u:guest p:password
  7. An IP phone (direct IP dial 10.95.79.46 - or dial via the PBX - Xtn. 5000 or dial via an outside POTS line (ask me for the number) or Ham Shack Hotline 50160
  8. A simple website: http://km6zpo-website.local.mesh/wordpress/
  9. And finally, you'll see a Winlink Relay there.
Got Winlink? Try a telnet post office connection to simulate the ability to send messages even with an Internet outage.  My Winlink Relay Server: km6zpo-winlink.local.mesh standard port 8772


---mark
KM6ZPO
Santa Ana


Bruce
 

Thanks Nat
For the update on AREDN!
 This makes me wish I lived on the coast! I am waiting for a usable AREDN signal to my roof in Mira Mesa!!
Why can't there be an AREDN node be installed on "Black Mountain" ??
Until then all I have is VARA HF & VHF.

73 Bruce  WA6DNT@...   WA6DNT@ winlink.org Cell:619-890-0789    Red Cross DST NNC9RC


On 9/13/2021 12:35 PM, Nat 2733E N6BRV wrote:

Quick summary:

 

Yesterday, I visited Andre K6AH QTH and exchanged my Homemade gourmet bread with his AREDN Antenna & Hardware.

I dully placed the Mikrotik 5GHz Antenna on my diminutive window and WOW, AREDN is running.

The 3 high Res (4Mb) pictures in the attachment were sent by RF AREDN through 5 GHz MikroTik. Looks like the original. Handshake – flawless.

 

In summary,

·         The one hop to AI6BX node worked well with 7.5Mbps (7,500Kbps) rate.  Actual speed test (tunnel through Los Angeles server, I’m in Carlsbad now) yielded ~ 0.4Mbps (400Kbps). Without optimized antenna direction.  Will retest when the antenna direction is optimized with San Diego server.

·         Everything is done by the AREDN software, just have to configure the setup appropriately.

·         Sending and receiving eMails, Browsing the Internet were as transparent as if I was using commercial WAN attached to my LAN.

 

Overall, I’m excited to learning more and grow with AREDN.

And many thanks again to Andre K6AH and the AREDN team. They’ve done an excellent job so far to say the least.

 

73' N6BRV Nat S.

 

From: main@ARC2-SDICC.groups.io [mailto:main@ARC2-SDICC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Andre Hansen
Sent: Friday, September 10, 2021 1:14 PM
To: main@arc2-sdicc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [ARC2-SDICC] Great use case of AREDN supporting cloud based computing

 

The theoretical limit on an AREDN link is 144 Mbps based on the 802.11n RF encoding scheme.  The 400 Mbps they describe in the article refers to the user WIFI connection.

 

Note that the San Diego AREDN backbone network is in the process of being redesigned to be in compliance with recent FCC spectrum changes.  Also note that ownership of the backbone has been transferred to Keith, AI6BX, because I am no longer able to service these nodes.

 

73,

 

Andre, K6AH

From: main@ARC2-SDICC.groups.io [mailto:main@ARC2-SDICC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Mark Warrick (KM6ZPO)
Sent: Friday, September 10, 2021 7:28 AM
To: main@ARC2-SDICC.groups.io
Subject: [ARC2-SDICC] Great use case of AREDN supporting cloud based computing

 

It is my understanding that the American Red Cross relies entirely upon their computing systems, all of which are cloud based. Therefore, I will focus my attention upon solutions that meet that basic operating need of every part of this organization.  

I am a ham radio operator, but I also have 40 years of computing experience. I recognize that no form of radio communications can support the data needs of the organization. AREDN CAN fill the gaps of necessary data links when they are down.  We only need to put effort into figuring out how. 

https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/publicsector/amateur-radio-meets-edge-computing-keep-disaster-response-teams-connected/?fbclid=IwAR2rnqiuG4vKnKjIpgnwB8bAfVUHjvCAtebLt8Uf83Y0jyMVAKyH32Nz3d4

—-mark

 


Bruce
 

Hi Mark
I am slowly coming to realize that AREDN will never be available on my roof in Mira Mesa, unless there is a node installed on "Black Mt" just NE of me (which currently prevents a path to Palomar). So to learn about this AREDN mode, I will have to go mobile in my Tacoma truck, and drive to some high elevation to get the 5.8 GC signal. Just what would I need to purchase in equipment, to run high speed AREDN mobile and what would I need to set up as an AREDN mobile relay point?? I am sure it would take two very  high gain dish antennas, to bridge the long distances as a relay point in San Diego, and also  relatively high power 5.8 GC transmitters. So what and how do I order as to manufacture model numbers for AREDN equipment and antennas for long distance point to point communications? I currently know very little about 5.8 GC equipment and antennas as well as the computer side of things.  Also how would I "AIM" these dish antennas from a mobile platform, to establish long distance relay communications?? From Cuyamaca Peak these path's out to the desert and back to San Diego would be at least 50 -90 miles.   (from my experience with 2.7 GC ITV signal from Mt. Soledad to Mira Mesa - all it takes is a small tree branch to block the 10 mile signal path)
73 Bruce   WA6DNT@...   WA6DNT@...   Red Cross DST  SHARES   NNC9RC  . 


On 9/13/2021 2:45 PM, Mark Warrick (KM6ZPO) wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

Excellent, Nat, you're on the AREDN MESH.  I agree that if you find a better mount point for that dish, you'll get better results.  But 7 Mbps is not too shabby.  That's plenty enough for voice and video calls.

http://n6brv-qth.local.mesh:8080/cgi-bin/mesh

Now that you're here, drop by my home node (KM6ZPO-HAP-LITE) to see some services that are common on the MESH:

http://km6zpo-hap-lite.local.mesh:8080/cgi-bin/mesh

You will find:
  1. A voice over IP PBX (you can't login - but you'll see the admin screen)
  2. An email server (useful for hams to communicate with non-hams) - Non hams can login from the non-ham (Internet) side: http://mail.km6zpo.com/Mondo/lang/sys/login.aspx
  3. MeshChat (simple, common "chat" service) http://km6zpo-pi.local.mesh/meshchat/ 
  4. A MeshMap http://km6zpo-pi.local.mesh//meshmap/webpage/map_display.php 
  5. A TeamTalk Server (voice, chat, file sharing, etc.)   http://km6zpo-pi.local.mesh:10333/   u:guest p:guest
  6. A Mumble Server (voice and text chat) http://km6zpo-mumble-server.local.mesh:64738/  u:guest p:password
  7. An IP phone (direct IP dial 10.95.79.46 - or dial via the PBX - Xtn. 5000 or dial via an outside POTS line (ask me for the number) or Ham Shack Hotline 50160
  8. A simple website: http://km6zpo-website.local.mesh/wordpress/
  9. And finally, you'll see a Winlink Relay there.
Got Winlink? Try a telnet post office connection to simulate the ability to send messages even with an Internet outage.  My Winlink Relay Server: km6zpo-winlink.local.mesh standard port 8772

---mark
KM6ZPO
Santa Ana


 

Hi Bruce,

I recommend you get a Microtik HAP and ask for a tunnel.  That way you can "see" what's on the MESH.  You can also use your phone as a hot spot in case the Internet goes out - you'll still have access to the MESH and all of its resources which may otherwise be unavailable during a wide scale internet and/or power outage.  

I am a firm believer that the big cellular companies will be the first to repair their communication systems and/or roll trucks out to areas to provide coverage.  You won't be able to expect that kind of service from cable internet and DSL companies.  And if you get onto AT&T FirstNet, even if the general cell coverage goes out, you'll still be able to call and get data services.  

Get this device, flash it with the AREDN firmware and then I'll be happy to provide you with an Internet tunnel:
https://www.amazon.com/d/Wireless-Access-Points/MikroTik-Dual-concurrent-Access-Point-RB952Ui-5ac2nD-US/B019PCF3QY/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&qid=1542424142&sr=8-1&keywords=hap+ac+lite&linkCode=sl1&tag=arednmesh-20&linkId=c63c6837b88b3c518c349dea517aea2a&language=en_US

Or if you can't figure out the flashing part, we can probably make a deal wherein I buy it for you, configure it and ship it to you pre-configured.

---mark, KM6ZPO


Bruce
 

Hi Mark
Many thanks for your reply. I can see that very quickly I will be over my head in this technology. I looked at the MikroTik. 

I now see this as a "Training" device to get me up to speed on AREDN thru this "Tunnel" (what ever that means.) - like a VPN? We do not have an operative "Land line" at this time Thou we have an "OOMA: connection thru our Spectrum cable. We use our cell phones 100% of the time. If the "Mikro-Tik" can supply an AREDN connection thru this "tunnel" thru my Spectrum cable connection to educate my feeble gray cells then YES I will be happy to purchase this "Mikro-Tik" as a starting point. But to be useful to Red Cross I will need  to later purchase equipment that can be used as a long distance  relay point between two very distant stations, as Red Cross tends to always set up their "Service Centers" and "Shelters" in the San Diego back country in the deepest radio holes.  I have now ordered the "Mikro-Tik" as a learning device. I just finished talking to my I.T. friend about how this works. He said he could download the AREDN program into the "Mikro-Tik" but for configuring it to the AREDN network would require your assistance. Does this "Tunnel" connection require a license or fees?

73 Bruce   WA6DNT@...   WA6DNT@...


On 9/17/2021 3:40 PM, Mark Warrick (KM6ZPO) wrote:
Hi Bruce,

I recommend you get a Microtik HAP and ask for a tunnel.  That way you can "see" what's on the MESH.  You can also use your phone as a hot spot in case the Internet goes out - you'll still have access to the MESH and all of its resources which may otherwise be unavailable during a wide scale internet and/or power outage.  

I am a firm believer that the big cellular companies will be the first to repair their communication systems and/or roll trucks out to areas to provide coverage.  You won't be able to expect that kind of service from cable internet and DSL companies.  And if you get onto AT&T FirstNet, even if the general cell coverage goes out, you'll still be able to call and get data services.  

Get this device, flash it with the AREDN firmware and then I'll be happy to provide you with an Internet tunnel:
https://www.amazon.com/d/Wireless-Access-Points/MikroTik-Dual-concurrent-Access-Point-RB952Ui-5ac2nD-US/B019PCF3QY/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&qid=1542424142&sr=8-1&keywords=hap+ac+lite&linkCode=sl1&tag=arednmesh-20&linkId=c63c6837b88b3c518c349dea517aea2a&language=en_US

Or if you can't figure out the flashing part, we can probably make a deal wherein I buy it for you, configure it and ship it to you pre-configured.

---mark, KM6ZPO


 

Hi Bruce,

This reply is for you and anyone else interested in dipping their toe into the MESH.  Yes the Microtik is a good training device and will help you figure out some basic networking skills you’ll need to plan out an RF network.  The minimum requirement is a decent internet connection (I would say at least 10mb down and 1mb up as a low minimum) and a router which you can do port forwarding on. Port 5525 is used for connections to other “nodes”. Your Microtik would be one of there “nodes”.  Next you need a tunnel which is sort of like a VPN tunnel except that unlike VPNs it’s not “secure”. In fact nothing is allowed to be secured or encrypted on the MESH to be in compliance with FCC rules (generally).  We’ll get into some possible exceptions later. 

The AREDN mesh operates on ham frequencies. Although your connection will initially be via the Internet, most of the nodes on the other side of that connection are communicating via RF. 

You can do a lot with just a tunnel abs you can be useful to DST even without a full RF link. For example, you can have an IP phone. Your OOMA device is an IP -based phone device. The concept is nearly the same.    You can also send Winlink messages via the MESH.  So there’s just a couple of many things you can do. You can read the docs in the Aredenmesh.org for more ideas. 


Don’t worry so much about building out a network of your own just yet.  Get the fundamentals down first. Explore the mesh and I’m certain you’ll start to see the light.

I’m willing to provide a brief tour of the MESH if you want to see it without investing anything  

—-mark 

 


 

I forgot to mention that the only “license” required to operate in the MESH is your ham license. The MESH is not owned by anyone. But it is restricted to use by hams. Third party traffic rules apply just like any other use of ham frequencies. 


—-mark


Bruce
 

Hi Mark

My new "Mikro-Tik hAP" will be here Monday. My I.T. friend said he could download the AREDN program, but configuring the "Tunnel" part may need help. There is an Orange County RACES drill on Oct 2 that will use AREDN. I will check in on 60 meters and also send a Winlink VARA message via XE2BNC-10. I would love to see the AREDN side in action, but there is an ARES VARA P2P exercise on the same day. I will let you know of my progress in getting on AREDN/Tunnel.

Many thanks for all your help! 

73 Bruce  Cell; 619-890-0789  WA6DNT@...  WA6DNT@...  Red Cross DST SHARES   NNC9RC  





On 9/18/2021 9:30 PM, Mark Warrick (KM6ZPO) wrote:

Hi Bruce,

This reply is for you and anyone else interested in dipping their toe into the MESH.  Yes the Microtik is a good training device and will help you figure out some basic networking skills you’ll need to plan out an RF network.  The minimum requirement is a decent internet connection (I would say at least 10mb down and 1mb up as a low minimum) and a router which you can do port forwarding on. Port 5525 is used for connections to other “nodes”. Your Microtik would be one of there “nodes”.  Next you need a tunnel which is sort of like a VPN tunnel except that unlike VPNs it’s not “secure”. In fact nothing is allowed to be secured or encrypted on the MESH to be in compliance with FCC rules (generally).  We’ll get into some possible exceptions later. 

The AREDN mesh operates on ham frequencies. Although your connection will initially be via the Internet, most of the nodes on the other side of that connection are communicating via RF. 

You can do a lot with just a tunnel abs you can be useful to DST even without a full RF link. For example, you can have an IP phone. Your OOMA device is an IP -based phone device. The concept is nearly the same.    You can also send Winlink messages via the MESH.  So there’s just a couple of many things you can do. You can read the docs in the Aredenmesh.org for more ideas. 


Don’t worry so much about building out a network of your own just yet.  Get the fundamentals down first. Explore the mesh and I’m certain you’ll start to see the light.

I’m willing to provide a brief tour of the MESH if you want to see it without investing anything  

—-mark